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Friday, January 08, 2010

Rolling Stone Writes Rambling, 10,000+ Word Article About Genocide In Darfur And Only Mention Jihad One Time

... and fails to use the word Islam a single time.

Look at the Google Cache page.

In one passsage they describe the breakdown of the peace talks which could have gotten the "refugees" (read Infidels) out of the camps and back into their homeland. See if you can decipher what the fuck is going on here (by the way, it is important to note that Minnawi and Abdul Wahid are negotiating for the "refugees, while the other names are the names of either U.N. players, or Arab Sudanese government leaders) :

The mediators gathered in a conference room, and called in Minnawi and Abdul Wahid, one after the other, Zoellick and Obasanjo working them over. Frazer, who had accompanied Zoellick to the talks, had visited Abdul Wahid in his hotel room earlier that day. The rebel leader had been putting on his tie, getting ready to sign the peace agreement. "He was so happy," Frazer recalls. The deal, she felt, had been in many ways written for Abdul Wahid — it even guaranteed him a powerful job, as head of the government's proposed Darfur Authority, with broad powers to rebuild the region. When the details had been announced, Abdul Wahid had practically floated out of the room.

But now, talking with Zoellick and Obasanjo in the palace, the rebel leader refused to sign. He had spent hours scouring the details of the land settlements, he announced, and it wasn't enough.

"Now come, my boy," Obasanjo said. "You haven't fought a war like I have, and won a war as I have done." If Abdul Wahid wanted to be a great leader of his people, Obasanjo said, he needed to sign.

Abdul Wahid refused to budge. It was a betrayal of his people, he said. He would be killed if he signed.

Frazer later came to believe that someone — maybe the Eritreans or the Libyans, both of whom had been backing the rebels — had gotten to Abdul Wahid. "He felt like his life was being threatened," she says. "He was begging for understanding, and we were twisting his arm."

Minnawi had begun the day conflicted about the deal

(Pastorius note: he was conflicted about a deal he was signing which had been brokered by the UN and negotiated with Abdul Wahid),

but throughout the session he seemed to be wearing down. He looked uncomfortable in his suit, and to the assembled diplomats he seemed much smaller than the occasion, intimidated by the power in the room. "If you don't sign," Zoellick (UN guy) told Minnawi, "we'll drop you. We'll drop you like a rock."

All night, the diplomats pressed Minnawi, pushing him to name any concessions he wanted. Eventually, near dawn, the rebel leader asked Obasanjo for time to consult his commanders in the field.

"When are you going to be back?" Obasanjo demanded.

"Soon," Minnawi said.

"What do you mean by 'soon'?" the Nigerian asked. "Christ said he would be back soon, and that was 2,000 years ago."

"Soon," Minnawi promised.

As the diplomats recessed, word began to spread that Minnawi's brother had been killed in a janjaweed raid.

10 thousand-plus words. No mention of Islam. Only one mention of Jihad, and here it is (it is very telling):

Back in Washington, with the possibility of intervention in Darfur slipping away, Jendayi Frazer renewed her push for military options. The effort seemed quixotic at best: Few believed the Americans, immersed in two theaters of war, would deploy to a third. But Frazer believed that President Bush, who took home a memo on Sudan each Friday, was seriously considering military action. "It was his inclination, absolutely," she says. Then, in November 2006, the administration's new envoy to Sudan, Andrew Natsios, made the mistake of mentioning to reporters that the White House was considering a "Plan B" in case diplomacy failed. The blowback was fierce. European allies were furious, and Bashir warned that sending U.S. troops to Sudan would only serve to attract terrorists and broaden the global jihad. Bush quietly shelved the idea of military action.

Yes, sending U.S. troops to Sudan would have broadened the global Jihad, because that's what Sudan is all about; JIHAD!

And, this Abdul Wahid character. Who the fuck is he? Gee, do you think he might possibly be a Muslim negotiating on behalf of the Infidel, and, if so, why?

He could simply be a representative of one of the oppressed Sufi Muslim tribes. They are considered Infidels too. But, Abdul Wahid said he couldn't sign the agreement because it would be a betrayal to his "people". The Ummah.

But, of course, Rolling Stone wouldn't recognize this.

The Sudanese and Darfur Genocides are all about Islam. They are all about Muslims waging Jihad against the Infidels. That's all it is about. There is nothing else to it.

And yet, no one will tell the truth.
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posted by Pastorius at permanent link#

7 Comments:

Blogger Damien said...

Pastorius,

Well at least it mentions Jihad.

Friday, January 08, 2010 1:29:00 am  
Blogger Pastorius said...

One little hint in a ten thousand-plus word article.

That's friggin pathetic.

Friday, January 08, 2010 1:32:00 am  
Anonymous cjk said...

Rolling Stone is about as far left as you can get.
Someone put me on some type of free magazine list and that's one that I get. It's absolutely otherworldly.

Friday, January 08, 2010 2:55:00 am  
Blogger Pastorius said...

When I was in my teens, it was my favorite magazine, other than Down Beat.

Friday, January 08, 2010 3:09:00 am  
Blogger Damien said...

Pastorius,

I've never even heard of Down Beat.

Friday, January 08, 2010 3:13:00 am  
Blogger Pastorius said...

It's a jazz magazine:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Down_Beat

Friday, January 08, 2010 4:17:00 am  
Blogger midnight rider said...

And a very good one. I think it's been around longer than Rolling Stone.

I haven't read Rolling Stone in probably 25 years. Except for Special Issues like when Ray Charles or Johnnny Cash died.

Jann Wenner proved himself to be a total dick and sellout even back then.

Friday, January 08, 2010 6:00:00 am  

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