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Tuesday, March 24, 2009

The Star Spangled Banner Was Originally About Subduing Muslims In Battle


UPDATES AT BOTTOM OF POST

Well, what do you know. The original Star Spangled Banner was about victory in the War against the Barbary Pirates (read Muslims).

From Her Royal Whyness (with special thanks to Democracy Broadcasting):

Earlier today, I viewed a video lecture 
(also forwarded link to you -  subject: Arabs and Zionists' tug-og-war over America since 1776 - Professor Michael Oren video)

given by historian and author 
Dr. Michael Orenhere . 


Quote from the end of the lecture (he's a real tease, that one) :

"Why the original lyrics of the 'Star Spangled Banner' talked about Muslims bowing down to the victorious flag of the United States."



Well, it turns out the Star Spangled Banner was originally written for Bainbridge and Stephen Decatur in 1805. 
 
In it, the lyrics included phrases:
"turbaned heads bowed" 
"for the brow of the brave"
"In vain frowned the desert,"
"To a far distant shore, to the battle's wild roar, "
"And pale beamed the crescent, its splendor obscured "
"By the light of the star-spangled flag of our nation."
 
The lyrics changed in the War of 1812.



Notes from  
Power, Faith, and Fantasy: America in the Middle East 1776 to the Present by Michael B. Oren

Chapter III - A Crucible of American Identity 

William Bainbridge, who was the first American sailor to the Ottoman capital September 1800, sailed to Algiers on "George Washington."
Hassan Dey made him transport goods to Turkey - a humiliating experience. He was treated well in Istanbul by Ottomans. Bainbridge was discouraged by the treatment of Americans and because Americans were still paying tributes to pirates. "I am sure they would not long be tributary to so pitifull a race of Infidels." 
 Thomas Jefferson decided to order ships to fire on pirates. The war with Tripoli began on May 14, 1851. (Tripoli declared war.) This was the First Barbary War.
The Star Spangled Banner, which was originally written for Bainbridge and Stephen Decatur in 1805, said "turbaned heads bowed" to the "brow of the brave" and "the star-spangled flag of our nation."
 


When America was involved in the War of 1812, no resources were available to fight the pirates. Finally, after the war, on May 15, 1815, Madison authorized conflict, and this began the 
Second Barbary War. They first engaged Algiers on the sea. Algiers lost and paid the US a large tribute. The US also received compensation from Tunis and Tripoli, which was a source of national pride for Americans. 


Francis Scott Key

(1779-1843)




The Star-Spangled Banner
"This Song was written by Francis Scott Key. After burning Washington, the British advance towards Baltimore, and were met by a smaller number of Americans, most of whom were captured and taken to the large fleet, then preparing to attack 
Fort McHenry. Among the prisoners was a Dr. Beames, an intimate friend of Mr. Key. Hoping to intercede for the doctor's release, Mr. Key, with a flag of truce, started in a sail-boat for the admiral's vessel. Here he was detained in his boat, moored from the stern of the flag-ship, during the terrible bombardment of twenty-five hours, and at last, seeing the "Star-spangled Banner" still waving, he seized an old letter from his pocket, and on a barrel-head, wrote the following stanzas:

I. 
Oh! say, can you see by the dawn's early light, 
What so proudly we hail'd at the twilight's last gleaming,
Whose broad stripes and bright stars thro' the perilous fight,
O'er the ramparts we watch'd, were so gallantly streaming;
And the rocket's red glare, the bombs bursting in air,
Gave 
proof through the night that our flag was still there.
Oh! say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave,
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!


II. 
On the shore dimly seen thro' the mist of the deep, 
Where the foe's haughty host in dread silence reposes,
Where is that which the breeze, o'er the towering steep,
As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half disclose?
Now it catches, the gleam of the morning's first beam,
In full glory reflected, now shines in the stream:
'Tis the star-spangled banner, Oh! long may it wave,
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave!"

[Source: S.B. McCracken (ed.), Michigan and the Centennial; Being a Memorial Record Appropriate to the Centennia Year 48 (Detroit, 1876)]

Song

When the warrior returns from the battle afar,
To the home and the country he nobly defended, 
Oh! warm be the welcome to gladden his ear, 
And loud be the joy that his perils are ended. 
In the full tide o. song let his name roll along,
To the feast flowing board let us gratefully throng, 
Where mixed with the olive the laurel shall wave, 
And form a bright wreath for the brows of the brave.
Columbians! a band of thy brothers behold, 
Who claim the reward of thy hearts' warm emotion, 
When thy cause, when thine honor urged onward the bold, 
In vain frowned the desert, in vain raged the ocean. 
To a far distant shore, to the battle's wild roar
They rushed, thy fair fame and thy rights to secure; 
Then mixed with the olive the laurel shall wave, 
And form a bright wreath for the brows of the brave. 
In the conflict resistless each toil they endured, 
'Till their foes fled dismayed from the war's desolation; 
And pale beamed the crescent, its splendor obscured 
By the light of the star-spangled flag of our nation.
 
Where each radiant star gleamed a 
meteor of war
And the turbaned heads bowed to its terrible glare, 
Now mixed with the olive the laurel shall wave, 
And form a bright wreath 
for the brow of the brave. 

Our fathers who stand on the summit of fame, 
Shall exultantly hear of their sons the proud story, 
How their young bosoms glowed with the patriot flame,
How they fought, how they fell, in the blaze of their glory. 
How triumphant they rode o'er the wondering flood, 
And stained the blue waters with Infidel blood; 
How mixed with the olive the laurel did wave, 
And, formed a bright wreath for the brows of the brave. 

Then welcome the warrior returned from afar 
To the home and the country he nobly defended, 
Let the thanks due to valor now gladden his car, 
And loud be the joys that his perils are ended. 
In the full tide of song let his fame roll along, 
To the feast flowing board let us gratefully throng, 
Where mixed with the olive the laurel shall wave, 
And form a bright, wreath for the brows of the bravo. 

[Evert A. & George L. Duyckinck, The Cyclopedia of 
American Literature 692 (Philadelphia: William Rutter & Co., 1880) (vol. 1)]


UPDATE: HRW further comments:

I was stunned to learn this bit of history of the "Star Spangled Banner". There's more that Michael Oren hinted at . . .here I transcribe the final moments from the very end of the video linked above (marker 41:27) Michael Oren states:

"One of my major inspirations for the book was to share the fascination with this extraordinary story to tell you why the original lyrics of the Star Spangled banner talked about Muslims bowing down to the victorious flag of the United States. . .why the original Statue of Liberty showed a veiled Arab woman holding a torch . . .you'll have to read the book to answer those questions."

snip
"But, at the end of the day the inspiration, the impulse was to create a context. A context of history. A context of the past in which Americans who today, as much as any time in our history, will have to make some very important decisions in the 
Middle East. Context of the past, in which you, all of you can begin to chart your future. Thank you."



I haven't even begun to explore the "Statue of Liberty" information yet. 

Question . . .why is it that this is the first time I'm hearing about this? This information should be part and parcel of our children's history books! 


UPDATE - Apparently, the song was originally called "When The Warrior Returns". It is written about on this site which pays tribute to the history of Memorial Day.


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posted by Pastorius at permanent link#

25 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

I was stunned to learn this bit of history of the "Star Spangled Banner". There's more that Michael Oren hinted at . . .here I transcribe the final moments from the very end of the video linked above (marker 41:27) Michael Oren states:

"One of my major inspirations for the book was to share the fascination with this extraordinary story to tell you why the original lyrics of the Star Spangled banner talked about Muslims bowing down to the victorious flag of the United States. . .why the original Statue of Liberty showed a veiled Arab woman holding a torch . . .you'll have to read the book to answer those questions."

snip
"But, at the end of the day the inspiration, the impulse was to create a context. A context of history. A context of the past in which Americans who today, as much as any time in our history, will have to make some very important decisions in the Middle East. Context of the past, in which you, all of you can begin to chart your future. Thank you."



I haven't even begun to explore the "Statue of Liberty" information yet.

Question . . .why is it that this is the first time I'm hearing about this? This information should be part and parcel of our children's history books!

HRW

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 2:20:00 am  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Here is some info found online about the Statue:

"The Statue of Liberty, carved in the likeness of an
Egyptian woman, was intended originally to stand at the
entrance to the Suez Canal to signify Egypt Bringing Light to Asia, but was brought to New York instead when its
Egyptian sponsor was bankrupted."

ada.asn.au/defender/Winter2007

HRW


FWIW, I do have Oren's book on CD, but haven't listened to the book in it's entirety yet. Although audio books are very convenient to use while at the gym or while waiting for children participating in after-school classes (dance, martial arts, religion, band etc), audio books aren't as convenient for bookmarking material for future use, leaving one to rely on the web for source material. Arghhhhh.

HRW

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 2:42:00 am  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

HRW that was a nice find,

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 3:20:00 am  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

eh?!
that´s not what i learnt. I learnt the statue of liberty was a gift from france to america (sculptor Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi).

veil? what veil?

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 3:45:00 am  
Blogger midnight rider said...

Ya know, Pasto, for someone who wasn't sure if she wanted to contribute to IBA HRW been doing a lot of contributin' lately.

Sure you don't want to make it official HRW?

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 3:46:00 am  
Blogger Pastorius said...

Anonymous,
I agree. The Statue of Liberty story doesn't make sense to me. There must be more to it, OR, nothing to it.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 3:47:00 am  
Blogger Pastorius said...

MR,
I think she wants us to sweeten the pot. Last time we offered her Babe of the Week.

Maybe she wants to be posted as Infidel Babe of the Millenium.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 3:48:00 am  
Blogger midnight rider said...

Done deal says I.

And 2! bottles of Wild Turkey!

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 3:49:00 am  
Blogger midnight rider said...

Or maybe we could change her moniker to Her Royal Babeness. . .

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 3:50:00 am  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Pastorius said...
There must be more to it...

yeah, it´s called islamization.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 3:58:00 am  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Anon asked at 3:45:00 AM
"eh?!
that´s not what i learnt. I learnt the statue of liberty was a gift from france to america (sculptor Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi)." veil? what veil?


This was a surprise to me too! Got to hand it to Michael Oren - he certainly captured my attention and instigated this thread!

The sculptor, Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi is indeed the same individual responsible for the design of our Statue of Liberty. The veil was part of the original plans for the statue when it was intended and merely a design for the Suez Canal.

Details here:

iViews.com - Egyptian Origins of the Statue of Liberty

Quote: "Michael B. Oren, in the following article excerpt from his book entitled Power, Faith and Fantasy reveals a piece of history that highlights the origins of the Statue of Liberty.

Oren tells us that French visionary named Frederic Auguste Bartholdi originally envisioned the lady of liberty as a Middle Eastern peasant women bearing a torch of light and freedom. While in Egypt visiting the great Luxor pyramids, and attending the Suez Canal opening ceremony, he planned to create a statue that would stand as a beacon of hope and freedom for the people of the Middle East.

In 1886 the statue would be erected on Ellis Island, as a monument that still challenges history to be a symbol of enlightenment for the world and a beacon of the right of passage for people towards freedom, hope and equality.
"Egypt Bringing Light to Asia," the original Lady Liberty intended by its creator, Frederic Auguste Bartholdi, to grace the entrance to the Suez Canal.

Enlightening the World

The project was the brainchild of a man whom Stone
[Charles Pomeroy Stone - read about him in a chapter the author, Oren provides online here] had once met in Egypt, an Alsatian sculptor ten years his junior, Frederic Auguste Bartholdi. The idea originated in Bartholdi's excursion to Luxor and his fascination with the area's ancient statues. "Granite beings of imperturbable majesty," the awestruck artist called them, remarking how their eyes appeared to be "fixed on the limitless future." At that moment, the handsome, dark-haired Bartholdi resolved to replicate that magnificence and so ensure his own immortality. Inspiration again graced Bartholdi at the lavish opening ceremony of the Suez Canal. He would carve the likeness of an Egyptian peasant woman holding aloft a torch of freedom. The monument, twice as high as the Sphinx, would guard the waterway's entrance and perhaps double as a lighthouse. Its name would be Egypt (or Progress) Bringing Light to Asia.

Bartholdi spent two years making sketches and terra-cotta models of his concept and persuading Khedive Isma'il to finance the construction. By 1871, however, Isma'il was bankrupt and incapable of servicing his debts, much less investing in statuary. Distraught, Bartholdi sought solace in a cruise to the United States. While sailing into New York harbor, he passed the egg-shaped Bedloe's Island and suddenly envisaged a new location for his icon-and a new meaning. Years of back-and-forth negotiations produced an arrangement in which the Americans would pay for the pedestal and France for the statue itself, to be constructed by Gustave Eiffel. There remained only to find a chief American engineer for the undertaking. Bartholdi remembered Stone.

The general, who had been imprisoned on Bedloe's Island early in the Civil War, knew the area well. He acquired the assistance of James Morgan and Samuel Lockett, both veterans of the Egyptian service, and began erecting the eighty-nine-foot-high pedestal and assembling the 350 pieces of Eiffel's copper colossus. Though originally scheduled to coincide with the centennial of America's independence, the dedication of the memorial did not occur until a decade later, in October 1886, a year before Stone's death.

The thousands of spectators who listened as President Grover Cleveland pledged "not [to] forget that liberty here made her home" gazed up at a creation that bore little resemblance to the one Bartholdi had visualized for Egypt. The Muslim peasant had been replaced by an idealized Western woman and the name of the piece changed from Bringing Light to Asia to Liberty Enlightening the World.



HRW

Pas & MR - Moniker chg to Royal Babeness or Infidel Babe of the Millenium and And 2! bottles of Wild Turkey! . . .them theres quite a temptation boys! However, I cannot take credit for any of this information. Michael Oren did the research, published a fantastic book and advertised it in the video linked in the thread. Many others who actually read Oren's book posted their own thoughts online and supplied the details I provided in my comments. I contributed no original thought or analysis to it. IBA contributors provide fresh ideas and personal insight, original thought and analysis. If/when my contribution reaches that water mark I'll feel qualified to accept your gracious and ever tempting invite. Right now, I see myself as one of those fuzzy tailed squirrels who hunts down little nuggets from the neighbors yards and brings them here to share. Perhaps someday, one of those nuggets will manage to root itself, plant an original idea and bear fruit to share.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 10:15:00 am  
Blogger Pastorius said...

Turned down again.

Unrequited love, it hurts so good.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 11:29:00 am  
Blogger Epaminondas said...

His book about the 67 war was terrific, especially compared with Segev's ..but I had thought this one looked dull. Now I have to add it to the list!

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 12:47:00 pm  
Blogger midnight rider said...

Speaking for myself and Pasto, HRW, we personally are very fond of fuzzy tailed squirrels.

However, until we can convince you otherwise we will continue to pine away.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 1:05:00 pm  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

this information is so frought with inaccuracies. first the barbary coast war started in may of 1801. it was fought with tripoli, we contiunued to pay tribute throughout the war to tunis and algiers. Tripoli declared war on us because the ship we had promised to them sunk twice en route to tripoli. Jefferson sent a bribe of $10,000 of his own money to the Bey of tripoli to not go to war. In fact we continued to pay tribute to algiers until 1824. All of this information is available in the national archives as the Department of the Navy put all of the original documents on Micro fiche. this is all bunk, do not believe a word. the truth is we had an expeditionary force of 200 marines we had planned to use in combination with the Bey's nephew to overthrow the government of tripoli, but the Bey made peace and we completely abandoned them. You might be interested to know that while France was the first country to recognize american independence, Morocco was the second.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 2:56:00 pm  
Blogger Pastorius said...

One would think Michael Oren would know what he was talking about.

So, do you think he is lying?

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 3:52:00 pm  
Blogger Pastorius said...

For those who do not believe this post, I have UPDATED the post multiple times with multiple sources.

Tuesday, March 24, 2009 4:10:00 pm  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Thanks for the updates Pastorius. The "Anacreon" was the name of the pub where our now noble anthem's melody was once a drinking song as demonstrated in this youtube presentation by James Burke Classics
This one from Connections³ Episode 5 part 3 (of 6). Here Burke reminds us that the Star Spangled Banner, in fact, comes from a rather bawdy and salatious drinking song known as "The Anacreontic Song" (or "To Anacreon in Heaven") - Lyrics by Ralph Tomlison Esq. as an ode to the 6th century Greek poet Anacreon who apparently had similar interests ;)

Lyrics posted at link

HRW

Wednesday, March 25, 2009 12:15:00 am  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Source book for lyrics:

Poems of the Late Francis S. Key‎ - Page 35
by Francis Scott Key, Roger Brooke Taney - 1857 - 191 pages
Where each radiant star gleamed a meteor of war, And the turbaned heads bowed to
its terrible glare, Now, mixed with the. olive, the laurel shall wave, ...

HRW

Wednesday, March 25, 2009 1:00:00 am  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

And another source book:

Spangled Banner - The Story of Francis Scott Key‎ - Page 147
by Victor Weybright - 316 pages

Limited preview -

____

Quote from bottom of page 147 after the last lyrics read "brows of the brave" the story continues:

"This was a feeble effort, designed obviously for a banquet in honor of the returned heroes of Tripoli. Yet it is sufficient to establish the fact that Francis Scott key himself, tone deaf or not, wrote "The Star-spangled Banner" into the tune,, and that the air was not selected, as is often said, by Judge Nicholson or by a flute player named Durang. The references to "in vain frowned the desert," "the Crescent," "the turbaned heads," fix beyond doubt the date of the song as coinciding with the. . ."

continues on page 148


"return of the naval heroes to celebrations in honor of their conduct along the North African shores.

*******************

This reference appears to be one used by Oren. It tells quite an entertaining story behind the evolution of this anthem.

HRW

Wednesday, March 25, 2009 1:23:00 am  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

For our doubting Anonymous - perhaps this is a topic that would interest 'Professor' Robert Wuhl for a future edition of "Assume the Position". Wuhl delivers imaginative, irreverent comedic history lessons that examine some of the facts, myths and myths-that-became-facts that have permeated American history. Mixing pop culture with historical events and lighthearted observations is just the ticket to bring this information to the general public in a most entertaining fashion.

Paging 'Professor' Wuhl!

HRW

Wednesday, March 25, 2009 1:36:00 am  
Blogger Pastorius said...

HRW,
You coined a great phrase there: Doubting Anonymous.

I love it.

I posted this over at LGF and am getting a bunch of grief about the post, particularly the title being inaccurate.

I guess all my titles are supposed to explain the nuances of the story, or else they are not fair, and I should be ashamed.

LOL

The last thing a journalist would want to do is captivate his audience with a title which inspires an intense interest.

One thing that is really amazing about all the criticism is that I actually was pretty careful about the title. I used the word "subduing" Muslims instead of "Killing" Muslims, though I'm pretty sure Key was, indeed, referring to killing Muslims.

I love people who never do shit in their lives except criticize those who do stand up and do something.

Wednesday, March 25, 2009 1:43:00 am  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Yes, well, despite kawfytawk's informative comment to your LGF link viewer post, Sharmuta simply would not accept the fact that Sir Francis Scott Key wrote both the lyrics familiar to our current anthem as well as the verses about turbaned heads for "When the Warrior Returns" -- which evidently was described as a feeble effort, designed obviously for a banquet in honor of the returned heroes of Tripoli. in Victor Weybright's text.

Spangled Banner - The Story of Francis Scott Key
By Victor Weybright
Published by READ BOOKS, 2007
ISBN 1406771007, 9781406771008
316 pages


As I mentioned some time ago, I was banned at LGF for down-dinging the lead lizard (gasp) when he turned on Fjordman. I would have enjoyed that debate. Glad to see it got some exposure. Thanks.

HRW

Wednesday, March 25, 2009 3:07:00 am  
Blogger DemoCaster said...

I'm thrilled to see the discourse which my going to videotape Michael Oren has spurred here.

If you like it, please subscribe for more free at DemoCast.TV

PS: As one Weblog Award Finalist to another, if you aren't paying me to reference my intellectual property (article, photo, videotape) on your own site, it's a basic courtesy to give "name- credit" - acknowledging the creator in the link. Failure to do so is a discourtesy. :-)

Wednesday, March 25, 2009 6:36:00 pm  
Blogger Pastorius said...

DemoCaster,
Sorry, I didn't know. This post, other than the UPDATES, was written by a woman who sends stuff into me. I trust her so much, I didn't bother watching the video. (I've been extremely busy lately).

So, I will amend the post and give you a shout out.

Thanks.

Wednesday, March 25, 2009 11:36:00 pm  

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